11. Rollin Rollin Rollin: Plover Photography for Dummies.

Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubiusThinking about nature photography you probably picture fresh green meadows, meandering rivers, foggy forests or something like that.
At least I did.

So when I recently cycled to a deserted piece of land along the highway, my romantic image instantly got killed.
This unsightly terrain was supposed to house a most lovely little plover family.
It’s quite a riddle to me why you would want to raise your cute fluffy babies on a bare piece of land with cars racing by, but I guess that must be some kind of Plover Habit.

Indeed, within no time I saw two plovers crossing the land – they were so small I initially mistook these adult birds for youngsters.
I was told that baby plovers are no bigger than a blowfly, but I just couldn’t believe it until I saw the babies: they are REALLY that tiny!

The light was perfect, the models were present, so all we had to do was span 30 meters without disturbing this tender new happiness.

Crawling inch by inch towards your subject is a proven method for photographing plovers.
Only one arm available, because the other one is holding a tele lens.
A huge disadvantage is that elbows and knees get severely damaged by the sharp rocks.

Fortunately my colleague photographer- tired of biting the dust- introduced a far more efficient method.
Instead of crashing your belly on the sharp stones, you just twist your body at an angle of 90 degrees to the subject.
Then gently roll around your long axis towards the bird, while holding one arm stretched to prevent your lens from getting damaged.
Obviously this requires some practice.

After a certain number of turns you might be a little dizzy, but elbows and knees are safe and more importantly; the bird is within reach!
An additional advantage is the fact that this rolling looks so clumsy that no bird will see any danger in it.
Disadvantage: the rolling makes you literally ROFL and even the utmost care can’t compensate for the vibration caused by all this laughter.;)

Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Little Plover Parent1
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Little Plover Parent2
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Little baby plover in hiding
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Sleeping little plover chick.
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Stretching little plover
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Mother plover holding a baby plover under her wings
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
How many little plover chicks will fit into a big one?
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
At least three...!
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
Baby plover in the last evening light
Kleine Plevier Little Ringed Plover Charadrius dubius
And another one...
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5 thoughts on “11. Rollin Rollin Rollin: Plover Photography for Dummies.

  1. The photo’s are both great, and seriously cute! There were no mistakes english wise, but you did forget a word on the seventh picture down, but I’m sure that it was just forgetting a word and not a mistranslation 🙂

  2. Rolling sounds great, I can do that! haha.

    Photo #4: That’s some hardcore snoozing going on there! He’s looks deep in concentration :D.

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